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Chizhou

Located in the southwest of Anhui province, on the southern bank of the Yangtze, Chizhou has a population of 1.56m and a history of more than 1,300 years.

Chizhou is a beautiful city with a rich Buddhist heritage; one of the most important Buddhist mountains in China, Jiuhuashan, is situated in the southeast of its administrative area. Jiuhua Mountain National Park attracts hundreds of thousands of tourists each year, and the local government is investing Rmb1.6bn in infrastructure projects to improve facilities. A site has been chosen for a new airport in Meilong town, 22km to the northeast of downtown Chizhou. Chizhou port has been specially designated by the provincial government to accommodate luxury passenger cruises.

Chizhou has recorded an average economic growth rate of more than 10 per cent over the past five years. Major industries include the processing of agricultural products, non-ferrous metal materials, non-metal mining (including calcite, limestone and dolomite), export-oriented textiles, garment and toy manufacturing, and tourism.

Even so, Chizhou’s economy is still relatively undeveloped, and it accounts for just 2 per cent of Anhui’s GDP.

Tongguan Non-Ferrous Metals, formerly known as Shanghai Alison Chizhou Non-Ferrous Metals Group, and before that Anhui Chizhou Non-Ferrous Metals Group, was founded in 1958. Its annual output of lead, copper and zinc amounts to 200,000 tons and it also produces about 160,000 tons of sulphuric acid.

Belgium-based Lhoist Group, a leading producer globally of limestone and dolomite, operates a wholly-owned dolomite fireproof material production base in Chizhou, taking advantage of rich local dolomite resources. Chizhou expects to become the fourth largest dolomite production base in the world.

Imerys of France has a wholly-owned plant in Chizhou engaged in the production of ground calcium carbonate, which is supplied to the paper-making industry. The plant has an annual production capacity of 120,000 tonnes a year.

Chizhou ETDZ, a provincial-level development zone, is located in the northeast of the city, 35km to the west of the Tongling Yangtze Bridge and 60km to the east of Anqing Yangtze Bridge and Anqing airport. Fronting the Yangtze to the north, the zone is linked to National Highway 318, which passes through the downtown area of the city. Set up in 1992, the zone hosts enterprises engaged in a variety of different sectors, including metal processing, new materials, foodstuffs, machinery and textiles.

National Highways 206 and 318 both pass through Chizhou. The 206 connects Yantai with Shantou, while the 318 links Shanghai with Youyiqiao in Tibet. The 46km Chizhou-Anqing section was put into operation in 2006. The Yangtze Riverside Expressway and the Hefei-Tongling-Huangshan Expressway also pass through Chizhou.

The Tongling-Jiujiang passenger railway line opened in September 2008, providing Chizhou with its first rail traffic connection. The planned 250km Nanjing-Anqing Railway will also pass through the city. Construction work on the line should be completed by the end of 2011.

Chizhou port is situated 36km upstream from Tongling and 60km downstream from Anqing. It is 2.5km from National Highway 318, but has no dedicated railway line.

Chizhou is well known for its rich reserves of non-metal ores, and its hinterland has become an important source of raw materials for both domestic and foreign iron and steel plants. The port has established itself as an important Yangtze transhipment centre for non-metal ores, and it also handles coal, crude oil, iron and steel, fertiliser, sand and cement, and metal ores.

Chinese shipping lines such as Sinotrans Shanghai and Wuhan Changwei International Shipping Corp operate regular services from Chizhou to Japan and South Korea. An increasing number of foreign ships sailing under flags of convenience also call here.

The major common-user port operator Chizhou Port Group operates five terminals, including one for passengers. Two of its major cargo terminals, Laogang and Jiangkou, are situated on the south bank of the Yangtze, in the northern part of the city, and are suitable for vessels of 5,000 dwt or more.

Container handling started at Chizhou in 2005, with one of Jiangkou Terminal’s two berths being designated for box traffic. Volumes are low, reflecting the city’s small level of foreign trade activity. The containerised business is dominated by light industrial products, such as bamboo goods, tea, clothes, fertiliser and non-metal ores.

Priority is being given to the construction of phase two of Jiangkou Terminal, which will include two 5,000 dwt berths, one for bulk goods and the other multipurpose.

The Laogang terminal is situated on the Guichi River, a branch of the Yangtze. In recent years, the Guichi has dried up considerably in the winter months, to the extent that the terminal has not been able to accommodate large vessels. The city plans to gradually transfer Laogang’s cargo-handling function to Jiangkou, and to dedicate Laogang in future to serving passenger cruise vessels.

If you want to read more about Chizhou, its leading companies, major investment zones, transport network, port infrastructure and the logistics experience of FIEs in the city, click here to order an e-version of the city profile for £15. Alternatively, for information on all the major Yangtze port cities and much else besides, click here to buy Yangtze Transport: Accessing China's Interior for £85.
     
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